Carlos Dinares: ROWING EFFICIENCY

I believe there are only two ways to get better at rowing: increase your capacity to create energy (by becoming more “fit”), or increase your ability to transform the energy you create into useful work, by becoming more efficient and coordinated. Most people spend most of their training time trying to increase their work capacity while ignoring efficiency altogether. I think that’s a big mistake. Inefficient rowing is like driving your car with the parking brake on. You won’t go anywhere very fast and you’ll rip it up in the process.

In tis video you can see how this Australian pair Olympic champion in Beijing 2008 is working with a bungee cord to slow down the movement and learn the efficient movement easier. Slowing things down make the learning process easier.

Coordination is the harmonious interaction of multiple joints to produce a useful movement.

Efficiency is an excellent measure of how coordinated any action is. In other words, the higher the efficiency, the more coordinated the action is and vice versa. Conversely, inefficient movement will always compromise performance and create the potential for pain and injury.

Efficiency in rowing means the ratio of useful work performed compared to the energy expended to do the work. Put another way, efficiency determines how much of the energy you expend by muscular contraction creates a successful movement.

Since efficiency necessarily implies a minimum of effort, we can recognize efficient movements by their apparent ease. In fact, one of the main impressions you will receive from watching a great athlete or dancer in person is that they make it look so amazingly easy.

Neuroscience reveals that the quality of your attention as you practice will affect how productive the practice will be. The best way to get better at a movement is to practice with the correct attitude and feedback. With the use of the rowperfect3 and the feedback of the software you can learn to feel the efficient rowing movement and repeat it again and again. By slowing down the movement it will be easier to get a good power curve and repeat it again and again to get to learn it properly.

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